The ‘Straw Man’ Fallacy = An ‘Aunt Sally’

Meet Your Strawman

Straw man – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

straw man or straw person, also known in the UK as an Aunt Sally, is a type of argument and is an informal fallacy based on misrepresentation of an 

Structure:

The straw man fallacy occurs in the following pattern of argument:

  1. Person 1 has position X.
  2. Person 2 disregards certain key points of X and instead presents the superficially similar position Y. The position Y is a distorted version of X and can be set up in several ways, including:
    1. Presenting a misrepresentation of the opponent’s position.
    2. Quoting an opponent’s words out of context—i.e., choosing quotations that misrepresent the opponent’s actual intentions (see fallacy of quoting out of context).[4]
    3. Presenting someone who defends a position poorly as the defender, then refuting that person’s arguments—thus giving the appearance that every upholder of that position (and thus the position itself) has been defeated.[3]
    4. Inventing a fictitious persona with actions or beliefs which are then criticized, implying that the person represents a group of whom the speaker is critical.
    5. Oversimplifying an opponent’s argument, then attacking this oversimplified version.
  3. Person 2 attacks position Y, concluding that X is false/incorrect/flawed.

This reasoning is fallacious because attacking a distorted version of a position does not address the actual position. The ostensible argument that Person 2 makes has the form:

“Don’t support X, because X has an unacceptable (or absurd or contradictory or terrible) consequence.”

However, the actual form of the argument is:

“Don’t support X, because Y has an unacceptable (or absurd or contradictory or terrible) consequence.”

This argument doesn’t make sense; it is a non sequitur. Person 2 relies on the audience not noticing this.

It’s frightening to learn that vulnerable people can be targets for an aunt Sally, as they wouldn’t have skills to refute arguments wrongfully made against them. The irony too is that the one’s who do know about the straw-man can also be the one’s fed false information and could easily blindly go along with same – or so it may appear out of pure false emotion?! Catch 22 situation. Caught between the river and the deep blue sea.

Advertisements

Critical thinking for beginners

The core of critical thinking  is developing the ability to understand and evaluate others’ arguments, and to construct arguments of one’s own.

We are surrounded by attempts to persuade us; we should accept some and reject others. This post is all about learning to discern which attempts to persuade fall into which category.

This means first learning to work out what argument – also what kind of argument –  is being presented to us. This requires an understanding of the various elements of arguments, and an ability to read a passage or listen to a speech and reconstruct its argument. Any statement that attempts to persuade you that something is true by offering at least one reason for thinking that it is so counts as an argument. The second skill involved is assessing the strength of the evidence offered, keeping an eye out for any logical fallacies that might have been committed.

Here’s a site with good, succinct introductions to of some of the most common fallacies.

The O’Malley Coat-of-Arms

O'Malley Coat of Arms

There are multiple versions of the O’Malley coat-of-arms in circulation. The earliest known is a stone plaque with the O’Malley

coat-of-arms on the wall of the Clare Island Abbey, which was built and funded by the O’Malley’s and dates from the 17th century.

It is also the assumed resting place of Granuaile. The plaque has an inscription in Latin: TERRA MARIQUE POTENS, (powerful on

land and sea). For Grace O’Malley, and no doubt the other members of the powerful O’Maille clan, it was their might on land and sea

which gained them their advantage. The coat of arms on the right is a contemporary version that I designed based on previous collections.

Of most importance, it is based on the earliest known shown on the left. The elements consist of armor; Celtic swords; bows & arrows,

perhaps one for each of the three main galleons in their fleet; together, they denote their might on land and sea. The steed denotes their

spirit in war, and wild boar symbolizes their fierce tenacity in battle; the ship denotes their exploits and might at sea, the Celtic crosses and

Celtic knots, particularly the triskele or triangular knots, symbolize the Trinity and their Christian faith. Like eternity, the knots are endless.

The Story Begins Here – Click on the Coat of Arms to Begin

The O'Malley Coat of Arms

If anyone is looking for their Irish heritage they should contact following sources.

The following resources may be of help to you.

The General Register Office of Ireland

The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland

Irish Roots

The National Library of Ireland

Irish Genealogy

Genealogical Society of Ireland

Irish Ancestors

National Archives of Ireland

O'Malley Coat of Arms Flag Bumper Sticker

Callinan

Callinan Coat of Arms (Family Crest) Pin

Last name: Callinan

This interesting surname is an Anglicised form of the Gaelic O’Callanain meaning “descendant of Callanan”, a personal name of uncertain origin. The surname is found mainly in county Clare using the spelling Callinan, and in counties Galway and Cork using the spelling Callanan. The main sept was a medical family to the McCarthy’s of Carbery, Co. Cork. The surname dates back to the early 15th Century, (see below). Further recordings include one Angus O’Callanan (1475) who was the chief scribe of the Book of Lismore (otherwise called the Book of the McCarthy Reagh). Six of the name bearers appear in King James 1’s army list, one being surgeon in Hon., Nicholas Browne’s regiment. One Charles Callenan married Elizabeth Busley on December 13th 1712 at St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Westminster, and Mary Callinan married James Hanneen on February 17th 1867, at Killofin, Co. Clare, Ireland. One Joseph Jeremiah Callanan (1795 – 1829), the Co. Cork poet was buried in Lisbon. The best known of his works in ireland and English is “Gougaune Barra”. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Angus O’Callanan, which was dated 1403, wrote a medical treatise for Mac Carthy Reagh, during the reign of King Henry 1V, of Bolingbroke, 1399 – 1413. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

© Copyright: Name Origin Research http://www.surnamedb.com 1980 – 2013

Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Callinan#ixzz2M6yeQOAC

O’Malley 1901/1911 Census Co. Clare

Search results Displaying results 1 – 10 of 45

Show all information

Records per page:

Surname Forename Townland/Street DED County Age Sex
O’Malley Jeremiah Knocknahila More, South Mullagh Clare 9 M
O’Malley Michael Knocknahila More, South Mullagh Clare 7 M
O’Malley Mary Knocknahila More, South Mullagh Clare 6 F
O’Malley Anne Knocknahila More, South Mullagh Clare 4 F
O’Malley William Joseph Glendree Glendree Clare 4 M
O’Malley John Glendree Glendree Clare 40 M
O’Malley Patrick Glendree Glendree Clare 28 M
O’Malley Helen Glendree Glendree Clare 24 F
O’Malley Patrick Glendree Glendree Clare 36 M
O’Malley Patrick Glendree Glendree Clare 69 M

Callinan: Census 1901 Co. Clare.

Residents of a house 22 in Cloghaunmore East (Creegh, Clare)

Show all information

Surname Forename Age Sex Relation to head Religion
Callinan John 40 Male Head of Family Catholic
Callinan Susan 32 Female Wife Catholic
Callinan Mary 60 Female Mother Catholic
Callinan Thomas 9 Male Son Catholic
Callinan John 8 Male Son Catholic
Callinan Mary Anne 5 Female Daughter Catholic
Callinan Catherine 4 Female Daughter Catholic
Callinan Patrick 2 Male Son Catholic
Callinan Edmund 1 Male Son Catholic

Report any error in transcription

View census images

Household Return (Form A)

Other original census images available

Enumerator’s abstract (Form N)
House and Building Return (Form B1)
Additional Pages: 2
Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings Return (Form B2)
My uncle told me that his mother’s name was Susan Callinan. There is one Susan mentioned here?

Callinan: Census 1901 Co. Clare

Residents of a house 2 in Caheraghacullin (Creegh, Clare)

Show all information

Surname Forename Age Sex Relation to head Religion
Callinan Michael 50 Male Head of Family R Catholic
Callinan Bridget 50 Female Wife R Catholic
Callinan Mary 23 Female Daughter R Catholic
Callinan Marty 14 Male Son R Catholic
Callinan Kate 12 Female Daughter R Catholic
Callinan Denis 9 Male Son R Catholic
Callinan Joseph 8 Male Son R Catholic
Callinan Anne 5 Female Daughter R Catholic
Flanagan Pat 3 Male Nephew R Catholic

Report any error in transcription

Tubridy: Census 1901 Co. Clare

Residents of a house 7 in Cloughaunbeg East (Creegh, Clare)

Show all information

Surname Forename Age Sex Relation to head Religion
Tubridy Bridget 60 Female Head of Family R Catholic
Tubridy John 37 Male Son R Catholic
Tubridy Martin 35 Male Son R Catholic
Tubridy Bridget 23 Female Daughter R Catholic

Report any error in transcription

Tubridy: Census 1901 Co. Clare

Residents of a house 8 in Cloughaunbeg East (Creegh, Clare)

Show all information

Surname Forename Age Sex Relation to head Religion
Tubridy Patrick 52 Male Head of Family Roman Catholic
Tubridy Mary 45 Female Wife Roman Catholic
Tubridy Patrick 24 Male Son Roman Catho
Tubridy Mary 20 Female Daughter Roman Catholic
Tubridy Martin 18 Male Son Roman Catholic
Tubridy Honor 16 Female Daughter Roman Catholic
Tubridy Bidella 15 Female Daughter Roman Catholic
Tubridy Ellen 13 Female Daughter Roman Catholic
Tubridy Michael 12 Male Son Roman Catholic
Tubridy Anne 10 Female Daughter Roman Catholic
Tubridy John 9 Male Son Roman Catholic
Tubridy Thomas 8 Male Son Roman Catholic

Report any error in transcription

Tubridy: Census 1901 Co. Clare

Residents of a house 29 in Creagh North (Creegh, Clare)

Show all information

Surname Forename Age Sex Relation to head Religion
Tubridy James 50 Male Head of Family Roman Catholic
Tubridy Margaret 52 Female Wife Roman Catholic
Tubridy John 23 Male Son Roman Catholic
Tubridy Murty 20 Male Son Roman Catholic
Tubridy Mary Ann 19 Female Daughter Roman Catholic
Collins Delia 10 Female Niece Roman Catholic

Report any error in transcription

View census images

Household Return (Form A)

Other original census images available

Enumerator’s abstract (Form N)
Additional Pages: 2
House and Building Return (Form B1)
Additional Pages: 2
Out-Offices and Farm-Steadings Return (Form B2)