Holocaust to be or not to be?

Ophelia- will you please help me out with this thinking. I’m stuck for words in knowing how to answer speakfaithfully…. http://bit.ly/QoVlSM 

Ophelia- will you please help me out with this thinking. I’m stuck for words in knowing how to answer speakfaithfully at twitter. Will you please tease it out, or show me where to go next in answering him, as I would very much like find one. Thanks in advance. I’m always getting stuck in conversations and don’t know how to continue them. I find it challenging, though by the same token, I should really be asleep in bed, but it was bugging me. No hurry at all. Regards, Marie-T

speakfaithfully says:
“The residential schools in the U.S. and Canada collectively were part of our version of Auschwitz, the pogroms, and apartheid.”
I see what you are saying and obviously it is not a direct comparison. That is why I said, “our version.”
But they are a part of our version of attempting to systematically dismantle and eliminate a race we deemed inferior to us.
Oh yeah I did not take it that way but I think you can compare them without diminishing either. NA suffered many massacres.
Marie-Therese says:
“I don’t think one should make an Auschwitz analogy with residential *schools.* I learned that a long time ago when making”…1/2
..a comparison with Irish industrial *schools* – where inmates were incarcerated via the court system. Awful but different.
The reason that was succinctly pointed out to me was that, one would be diminishing atrocities that occurred to Jewish folk
In pointing this out, I sincerely don’t intend to undermine atrocities that occurred in residential / industrial *schools*.
I thus went looking up the dictionary to see the definition of version.
A description or account from one point of view, especially as opposed to another: Your version of the accident differs from mine.

An account of a matter from a certain point of view, as contrasted with others his version of the accident is different from the policeman’s.

I remember years ago somebody pointing out at B&W that one should not equate what happened in industrial *schools* to that which occurred in the Holocaust in Nazi Germany. It was something to that effect, anyway. I don’t recall the exact details. Some survivors, including myself were making the association and calling the atrocities that occurred to us in industrial *schools* as our mini-Holocaust, or Ireland’s mini-Holocaust. I think that someone else may have brought up the famine.and said that one could not make the comparison. As the famine was also a kind of genocide. The reason was that the Holocaust belonged to the Jewish people and should remain theirs and not be stolen from them by other atrocities belonging to other nations in other periods. Every atrocity is individual and belongs solely to those who suffered, take also the genocide in Rwanda.

lacanlune says:
I agree, I think we need our own Irish word for this experience, like we know ‘The Famine’ doesn’t mean Biafra.
 —
In light of what speakfaithfully and lacanlune said I looked up dependable google. I didn’t have far to search. I noticed that there was mindbogglingly a plethora of information out there with respect of making comparisons with the Holocaust. However, for now, I just took one example, which is connected to abortion. I must try to stick to a narrow angle, as I could go astray if I was to include too many examples. Indeed, it was the following paragraph wording that struck a chord.
To gain a lesson from the Holocaust demands comparison. To compare the Holocaust, though, refutes its unique, horrific, incomparable nature. Yet to not compare denies us and all Mankind the potential for a most significant and necessary lesson. Our challenge is to respond correctly to this paradox.
I think what lacanlune says is very thought-provoking, that we do need our own Irish word for the atrocities that occurred to survivors of industrial *schools* Magdalen laundries. If a word was found, where would that leave people such as speakfaithfully and those who were in industrial *schools*, which were dispensed with in Great Britain in 1933 and replaced with residential schools.
Survivors of industrial *schools* in Ireland were sent there by the judiciary. So they were incarcerated to remain in the child prison-like environments until they were 16 years old.  On the other hand survivors who went into residential schools were not imprisoned by their respective states. I know there is a dreadful worldwide history that speakfully has touched upon (which would wreck my brain just thinking about it on a global basic) I think that there is a differentiation there. The state colluded with the religious in the incarceration of children. The legal binding thing was unlawful.

@speakfaithfully In pointing this out, I sincerely don’t intend to undermine atrocities that occurred in residential / industrial *schools*.

@speakfaithfully The reason that was succinctly pointed out to me was that, one would be diminishing atrocities that occurred to Jewish folk

The residential schools in the U.S. and Canada collectively were part of our version of Auschwitz, the pogroms, and apartheid.

@speakfaithfully ..a comparison with Irish industrial *schools* – where inmates were incarcerated via the court system. Awful but different. 

The residential schools in the U.S. and Canada collectively were part of our version of Auschwitz, the pogroms, and apartheid.

@speakfaithfully I don’t think one should make Auschwitz analogy with residential schools. I learned that a long time ago when making…1/

@MarieTherese39 I see what you are saying and obviously it is not a direct comparison. That is why I said, “our version.”

@MarieTherese39 But they are a part of our version of attempting to systematically dismantle and eliminate a race we deemed inferior to us.

To gain a lesson from the Holocaust demands comparison. To compare the Holocaust, though, refutes its unique, horrific, incomparable nature. Yet to not compare denies us and all Mankind the potential for a most significant and necessary lesson. Our challenge is to respond correctly to this paradox.

@MarieTherese39 @MrPaddyDoyle I agree, I think we need our own Irish word for this experience, like we know ‘The Famine’ doesn’t mean Biafra.

@speakfaithfully In pointing this out, I sincerely don’t intend to undermine atrocities that occurred in residential / industrial *schools*.

@MarieTherese39 Oh yeah I did not take it that way but I think you can compare them without diminishing either. NA suffered many massacres.

  

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s