Es Burebüebli

Es Burebüebli Volksweise (Bernese Dialekt)

Es Burebüebli mah-n-i nit, das geseht me mir wohl a, juhe!
es Burebüebli mah-n-i nit, das geseht me mir wohl a.
Fi-di-ri, fi-di-ra, fi-di-rall-la-la, fi-di-rall-la-la, fi-di-rall-la-la,
es Burebüebli mah-n-i nit, das geseht me mir wohl a.
‘s mueß einer sin gar hübsch und fin, darf keini Fähler ha, juhe!
‘s mueß einer sin gar hübsch und fin, darf keini Fähler ha,
Fi-di-ri, fi-di-ra, fi-di-rall-la-la, fi-di-rall-la-la, fi-di-rall-la-la,
‘s mueß einer sin gar hübsch und fin, darf keini Fähler ha.
Und Herebüebli git’s ja nit, wo keini Fähler ha, juhe!
Und Herebüebli git’s ja nit, wo keini Fähler ha, Fi-di-ri, fi-di-ra, fi-di-rall-la-la, fi-di-rall-la-la, fi-di-rall-la-la,
Und Herebüebli git’s ja nit, wo keini Fähler ha.
*Drum bleib i ledig bis in den Tod, so hat die Lieb ’es Änd,
drum bleib i ledig bis in den Tod, so hat die Lieb ’es Änd,
Fi-di-ri, fi-di-ra, fi-di-rall-la-la, fi-di-rall-la-la, fi-di-rall-la-la,
drum bleib i ledig bis in den Tod, so hat die Lieb ’es Änd.

(Mau ufe, mau abe, mau linggs, mau rächts mau füre, mau hingere, mau linggs, mau rächts X6)

The story in the “Burebüebli …”. A young lady takes stock of her unmarried status. She decides that she really does not want to marry a farmer’s son; no she would rather like the son of an upper class family (Herren Büebli); he should be: handsome, good mannered and, above all, not have any character faults (vices). Experience has taught her, that no young man from an upper class family is flawless in character.

I don’t like a farmer’s boy That shows when you look at me – yuhe! I don’t like a farmer’s boy That shows when you look at me!

It has to be one, quite handsome and nice, Mustn’t have any faults – yuhe!
It has to be one, quite handsome and nice, Mustn’t have any faults!
Fidiri fidira fidirallala fidirallala fidirallala It has to be one, quite handsome and nice,
Mustn’t have any faults!
And gentlemen’s sons without faults Don’t exist – yuhe!
And gentlemen’s sons without faults Don’t exist!
Fidiri fidira fidirallala fidirallala fidirallala And gentlemen’s sons without faults
Don’t exist!
Once up, once down, once left, once right, Once forward, once backward, once left, once right.* X6

Conclusion: she decides to stay “available” all her entire life, till she dies, at that point it will all be over with love anyway. Fideri fideri fideralla la la …..Es Buurebüebli mani nid.

I get very sentimental when I listen to this traditional Swiss German folk-song. I always played it on the guitar and sang it with such pride. It always fascinated Swiss tourists to Britain, if they happened to have been within earshot of me belting it out with gusto and joy. They found it rather amusing that somebody from Ireland living in England could sing so easily in a Swiss dialect. I would explain to them that I was a mere teenager when I lived in Switzerland. The head of the family I had stayed with as Au-pair had insisted that I had to learn to speak their language and refused outright to speak to me in English. Nobody else in the village, just outside Rothkreuz, could speak English, so to my chagrin, then, I simply had to copy the people in the way that they spoke. Not only did I learn quickly out of desperation in wanting to communicate, but I picked up the intonation and sounds, which made me indistinguishable to the locals (and even at times got me safely across the border – near Shaffhausen, into Germany minus my passport, when I returned at an older age to work as a rep, selling encyclopaedias with students from a multitude of European countries) I also learned to differentiate between Hoch Deutsch and Schwyzer-Deutsch, as the former was spoken and written in the media. It’s very confusing to outsiders, who go to Switzerland and who want to specifically learn German in the German speaking part of the country. Not to be recommended to those who have no natural gra for languages.
H/t  Swiss maiden @ Autumn Cottage Diarist
Ditto  Lyric Es Burebüebli
H/t  Video 

This song is part of a collection of 20 traditional popular song; the CD accompanies the book “Aus dem Röseligarten” (from the little rose garden) by Otto von Greyezer, with illustration by Rudolf Münger.
A shame the book is not yet translated into English because it is a treasure of elegance and amorous labour by the authors and a gold mine of information about traditional (authentic) Swiss folk songs.

*I knew a different text to the last (original) verse up above – that goes:

Drum bleib i ledig bis in den Tod, so hat die Lieb ’es Änd,

So went in search and found it…: It would have been a more modern text version.

4. Drum bliben-i ledig, bis i Hochzit ha, so het die
Lieb es End, juhe …..

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